News Roundup: FDA Redefines "Healthy" Label

 

The Food and Drug Administration will re-evaluate its definition of "healthy", which could eventually change how foods are marketed. This comes in light of strong and consistent evidence which supports the recommendation that healthy (unsaturated) fats can and should be a part of a healthy diet. As the new Dietary Guidelines for Americans outlines, unsaturated fats are associated with reduced total and LDL cholesterol as well as reduced heart attacks and cardiovascular disease-related deaths.

Last April, the FDA sent a letter to the makers of KIND bars asking them to remove the “healthy” label on four of their bars. According to current FDA guidelines, to use the “healthy” label, a food must have no more than 1 gram of saturated fat per serving and contain no more than 15 percent of its calories from saturated fat, which the FDA says is not true for these four bars.  Now, a year later, the FDA has reversed its stance and says KIND bars can use the “healthy” label and the FDA is reexamining its definition of “healthy”.

This week’s news roundup brings to you a collection of articles and blog posts related to the FDA redefining “healthy” in light of the KIND bar decision.

FDA reverses stance, affirms KIND can use “healthy” on labels. KIND. “The FDA has confirmed that it intends to reevaluate the regulatory definition of “healthy,” an action that was prompted in part by KIND. The current standard was created with the best intentions 20 years ago, when the benefits of consuming “good fats” (like those found in nuts) were not fully understood. Under the regulation, foods like fat-free chocolate pudding and children’s sugary cereal can bear a healthy nutrient claim, but foods like nuts and avocados can’t.”

Are Kind bars 'healthy'? FDA settles battle over snack label. Today. "Consumers want to make informed food choices and it is the FDA's responsibility to help them by ensuring labels provide accurate and reliable nutrition information. In light of evolving nutrition research, forthcoming Nutrition Facts Labeling final rules, and a citizen petition, we believe now is an opportune time to reevaluate regulations concerning nutrient content claims, generally, including the term 'healthy',"

The FDA Is Going To Change The Definition Of ‘Healthy’ Food. Think Progress. “As more and more and more Americans are trying to make eating decisions based on sound nutrition, marketers are proclaiming their foods as “antioxidant,” “whole-grain,” “heart-healthy,” “gluten-free,” and “natural” — nutrition buzzwords that are largely meaningless in terms of nutritional value, or, in the case of “healthy,” are 20 years out of date.”

FDA to re-evaluate definition of 'healthy'. Yahoo! “The move to rethink "healthy" comes as dietary trends have shifted, with more people expressing concern about sugar and questioning low-fat or low-calorie diets. But any change in the term's regulatory definition could take years. The FDA's final rule on gluten-free labeling, for instance, took more than six years to complete.”

 

 

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